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Incompleteness and uncertainty in quantum mechanics: the formulation of problems and the search for ways to overcome them. Scientific-philosophical and historical digression

Professor Savchenko and Koveshnikov, Scientists about my discoveries

In 2011, the scientific journal Philosophy of Education of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (No. 5 (50) 2013) published a paper by Yevgeny Koveshnikov from the Ussuriisk State Pedagogical Institute entitled Incompleteness and uncertainty in quantum mechanics: the formulation of problems and the search for ways to overcome them. Scientific-philosophical and historical digression. In this article, the author discuses the theory by Vasily Yanchilin (page 118, 119, 122).

About the author of the article:

Evgeny Koveshnikov: at the time of writing the paper, he was an assistant of the Department of Mathematics, Physics and Methods of Teaching, School of Pedagogy, Far Eastern Federal University. He defended his thesis in philosophy of physics.

About the journal:

Link to the journal:  http://sibran.ru/journals/PhO/

Philosophy of Education, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

ISSN: 1811-0916

Chief Editor:

Nalyvaiko Nina Vasilyevna: Doctor of Philosophy, Professor, Leading Researcher of Institute of Philosophy and Law of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Director of the Research Institute of Philosophy of Education of the Novosibirsk State Pedagogical University

Founded in 2001.

Registered: Federal Service for Supervision in the Sphere of Communications, Information Technologies and Mass Communications PI No. 77-12553 of April 26, 2002.

Founders: Novosibirsk State Pedagogical University, Institute of Philosophy and Law of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences

Editorial address:

630126, Novosibirsk, ul. Vilyuyskaya, 28, cab. 329 of the main building

Novosibirsk State Pedagogical University

Tel./fax: (383) 244-16-71

 

Download the article in Russian:

Лапласов детерминизм

Texts in the paper that discuss Yanchilin’s theory:

Page 118

[4] means Yanchilin’s book (see References)

The idea of spontaneity, randomness in nature already arose in antiquity as a denial of pessimistic fatalism, and then it was rejected in the era of classical science and reanimated in the 20th century. The brightest example of the struggle between determinism and indeterminism in the minds of people is quantum mechanics that was born from the ideas of E. Schrodinger, N. Bohr, L. de Broglie, W. Heisenberg and other researchers in the first third of the 20th century. It is pointless to talk about this science as a single science. In fact, there are two mechanics, more precisely, its interpretations: statistical and Copenhagen. The basic idea of statistical interpretation is “at each moment of time, an electron (or another particle) is in a specific spot in space. The wave function only describes the probability of its being in one place or another and does not give knowledge of the actual location of an electron. In this sense, quantum mechanics is not complete” [4, p.87].

118

Page 119

[4] means Yanchilin’s book (see References)

The main idea of the Copenhagen interpretation is “at each moment, an electron does not have a specific location. It really does have a different probability density (namely, |ψ|2) at different points in a certain region. That is, the wave function gives a complete description of the motion of even one electron” [4, p. 87].

Quantum mechanics in statistical interpretation is, in fact, the modernized determinism of Laplace, his descendant. Even a slogan that if something cannot be explained, it is only the result of our ignorance, here it is preserved. The Copenhagen interpretation is the quintessence of indeterminism in nature, it expresses the idea of objectively existing uncertainty and unpredictability.

Almost a century-old problem of the duality of quantum mechanics says that the struggle in the minds of scientists is still going on. The search by some physicists of certain “hidden parameters” responsible for the predetermined behavior of an electron has a chance to turn into a search for a fern flower or a proof of Euclid’s Vth postulate. In the early 2000s, Russian physicist V.L. Yanchilin suggested the way out of the situation. He took an indeterministic Copenhagen interpretation. After finishing it and eliminating some provisions, he created his own (and third in a row) interpretation. So randomness finally defeated determinism? Not really. There are a number of serious problems in this regard.

119

References

 Yanchilin V.L. Uncertainty, Gravitation, Space. – М.: Editorial URSS, 2003. – 248 p.

122

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